a farmer and his donkey in Zamora Province haul flowering nabiza, turnip plants, to feed his cattle or to be pressed for vegetable oil. Spain, March 1978

a farmer and his donkey in Zamora Province haul flowering nabiza, turnip plants, to feed his cattle or to be pressed for vegetable oil. Spain, March 1978

(Source: nationalgeographicscans, via posemodern)

fuckyeahmadrid:


(via rawrzuhlind)


¡Neptuno!

fuckyeahmadrid:

(via rawrzuhlind)

¡Neptuno!

(photo: wolfoverclocked)
Sopa de Ajo (Garlic Soup), sodiumlitskies Style
This recipe means a lot to me. It is a dish to be turned to in hard times. It transforms poor, poor ingredients into a dish that comforts and heals. You will need:
A small pot
1 generous tbsp olive oil
4 - 6 garlic cloves, crushed and minced
1 stale crusty white bread roll (or equivalent portion of a loaf or baguette), cut into very small cubes
1 tbsp smoked paprika
2 cups chicken broth
1 - 2 eggs
salt to taste
Do these things:
Over medium heat, saute the garlic in the olive oil until it is golden brown.
Cut the heat and add the paprika.
Add the cubed bread as soon as you can to prevent the paprika from burning. Bring the heat up to medium and heat and push the bread around to fry it a bit. (This never really works for me because I am afraid of burning the ingredients and I can’t see anything happening and the value it adds is questionable, but if it works for you, great).
Add the chicken broth and bring the ingredients to a boil.
Reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
Crack an egg (or two) into the soup and wait 2 - 3 minutes, or until the white has cooked. The goal is to poach it and have a runny yolk. (If you are fancy and don’t mind washing another dish, poach the egg separately and add it to the soup at the end of the 20 minutes).
That’s it. Serve in a bowl.
This is an incredibly flexible recipe. Ingredient amounts can be adjusted to taste, Unless you burn the garlic, paprika, or bread, you cannot mess this dish up. What’s more, this recipe uses ingredients you probably have lying around, except maybe the smoked paprika. Get some if you don’t, it is a magical seasoning. Plain paprika will do, but smoked paprika really makes it twice the dish. When making the dish for myself, I like to use 50% spicy smoked paprika and 50% sweet smoked paprika.

(photo: wolfoverclocked)

Sopa de Ajo (Garlic Soup), sodiumlitskies Style

This recipe means a lot to me. It is a dish to be turned to in hard times. It transforms poor, poor ingredients into a dish that comforts and heals. You will need:

  • A small pot
  • 1 generous tbsp olive oil
  • 4 - 6 garlic cloves, crushed and minced
  • 1 stale crusty white bread roll (or equivalent portion of a loaf or baguette), cut into very small cubes
  • 1 tbsp smoked paprika
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 - 2 eggs
  • salt to taste

Do these things:

  1. Over medium heat, saute the garlic in the olive oil until it is golden brown.
  2. Cut the heat and add the paprika.
  3. Add the cubed bread as soon as you can to prevent the paprika from burning. Bring the heat up to medium and heat and push the bread around to fry it a bit. (This never really works for me because I am afraid of burning the ingredients and I can’t see anything happening and the value it adds is questionable, but if it works for you, great).
  4. Add the chicken broth and bring the ingredients to a boil.
  5. Reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
  6. Crack an egg (or two) into the soup and wait 2 - 3 minutes, or until the white has cooked. The goal is to poach it and have a runny yolk. (If you are fancy and don’t mind washing another dish, poach the egg separately and add it to the soup at the end of the 20 minutes).

That’s it. Serve in a bowl.

This is an incredibly flexible recipe. Ingredient amounts can be adjusted to taste, Unless you burn the garlic, paprika, or bread, you cannot mess this dish up. What’s more, this recipe uses ingredients you probably have lying around, except maybe the smoked paprika. Get some if you don’t, it is a magical seasoning. Plain paprika will do, but smoked paprika really makes it twice the dish. When making the dish for myself, I like to use 50% spicy smoked paprika and 50% sweet smoked paprika.

princesscentury:

HOLA MADRID!
¿Quieres bailar conmigo?

princesscentury:

HOLA MADRID!

¿Quieres bailar conmigo?

National Flags Created From the Foods Each Country Is Commonly Associated With

Australian advertising agency WHYBIN\TBWA re-created 17 national flags common to each nation to promote the Sydney International Food Festival. The event is Australia’s largest food festival and had almost a million attendees last year and was attended by chefs from all over the world.

guardian:

We asked you to share your photos of the 250 mile human chain along the coast of the Catalonia region created to mark National Catalan day on Wednesday. Here is a selection of your photos from the region and around the world.

(via npr)

Gorbea, in the Basque Mountains, Spain
taken by my brother, May 2013

Gorbea, in the Basque Mountains, Spain

taken by my brother, May 2013

lostsplendor:

Madrid, Early 1900s

lostsplendor:

Madrid, Early 1900s

(via lostsplendor)

Monumento a las victimas del 11-M; Alcalá de Henares, Madrid

Monumento a las victimas del 11-M; Alcalá de Henares, Madrid

La Cibeles, vista desde la calle de Alcalá hacia Gran Vía, llena de  cientos de aficionados celebrando la victoria del Mundial.

La Cibeles, vista desde la calle de Alcalá hacia Gran Vía, llena de cientos de aficionados celebrando la victoria del Mundial.

My Mother The Spaniard’s Sangria Recipe
Posted Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 9:27.
Tagged: Alcohol.Sangria.Spain.Rioja.Wine.

A pitcher or a punchbowl
1 bottle (750 mL) of Rioja wine
1 Tbsp. cinnamon sugar
75 mL Martini & Rossi Dry vermouth
1 L Diet Sprite or Sprite Zero*
1 orange
1 lemon OR 1 lime
1 peach (preferable)
1 banana (optional)

First, cut the fruit into pieces. My mother recommends cutting it into wedges, and then cutting those wedges in half. Put that shit in your pitcher/punchbowl. Add the cinnamon sugar. Add the Sprite (slowly or it will fizz). Add the Wine. Stir that shit. It’s okay to add ice if you like.

*If we were in Spain, my mother would use “Gaseosa” (a flavorless, lightly sweetened fizzy drink) and lemon juice. Here, she substitutes Sprite. She cautions you not to use regular Sprite, otherwise your Sangria will be too sweet.


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